Janice’s Review Blog

Native American knowledge preserved

Posted on: September 5, 2010

Bobby Lake-Thom records Native American history.
Bobby Lake-Thom records Native American history.

The hummingbird acts as a messenger of good luck, but she also possesses other positive attributes. Bobby Lake-Thom, a traditional Native healer, records valuable Native American information like this in his book, “Spirits of the Earth.”

Throughout the book Lake-Thom shares prayers, stories, ceremonies and other Native American knowledge not normally recorded in writing.

“Symbols have power and meaning,” writes Lake-Thom.

He shows a diagram of the Native Symbolic Thinking. In this diagram the stations of life: birth, puberty, adulthood and elder become linked to the directions east, south, west and north, respectively, along with the seasons spring, summer, fall and winter. This symbolic thinking helps people to adjust to their new stage in life.

“The symbol and power of the circle creates and promotes unity and wholeness,” writes Lake-Thom.

Lake-Thom shares stories of incidents that happened to him and his family. By taking the time to pay attention to creatures that appear, Lake-Thom avoids or becomes prepared for incidents that occur.  While others make fun of his warnings, they soon learn that listening to Lake-Thom saves problems for them.

Another portion of the book shows readers how to explore their dreams by using Native American cultural systems. A list of 11 items helps to show the value of dreams and how to use them to advantage.

By sharing Native American stories, the reader begins to realize why Nature becomes so important to the Native American community. Native Americans still cling to their traditional beliefs even though others tried to change their ways. By understanding the Native American culture, readers come to learn “that mankind is not separate from Nature.”

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